Author Topic: Not so good news  (Read 2503 times)

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Belladonna

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Not so good news
« on: April 21, 2012, 09:56:57 AM »
Oh dear. We need to up our game on the PP beach it seems;

Quote;

 Pollença has lost this year the four blue flags with the Foundation for Environmental Education (FEE) internationally recognized quality of the beaches of the municipality. The government team (PP-Lliga) has decided this year not to process the application for renewal of the blue flags of Cala Molins, Cala Barques, Formentor beach and beach Tamarells by the fear that these were not forthcoming in the case not meet the requirements demanded by the international organization FEE.

This was confirmed yesterday the mayor of Pollença, Bartomeu Ochogavía Encrypt (PP) who explained that "with the problems encountered last year with the delay in awarding the contract to operate the beaches we were difficult to get the flags and the lord of the Middle Environment, Maria Buades decided not to make the application '.

The news has sparked criticism from the opposition. PSM spokesman, Encrypt Bennàssar Bartomeu said yesterday "we regret that the City Council, the management was done last year, has decided not to apply the blue flags." "It is convenient to put the batteries to recover the blue flags that have a certain prestige in the international tourism," added the spokesman of nationalism.

According to Bartholomew Bennàssar Encrypt "the excuse to blame the past is low, the current government team begins to manage their own mistakes, loss of distinctive because of their management."

While it is true that the exploitation of the beaches of Port de Pollença a year ago with some delay took place on schedule and that the change caused a temporary shortage dealer services and signaling is also true that these problems are only girded the beaches of Port de Pollença. In Formentor, Cala Barques and Cala Molins, who also possessed blue flags, there was no change in dealership.

Pollença was in 2011 the municipality of Nord de Mallorca with the highest number of Blue Flags (4) compared to Alcudia (2), Wall (1) and Santa Margalida (2).

After all is said and done, a lot more will be said than done!

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Belladonna

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2012, 10:36:19 AM »
Ah, acatually its not as bad as it first appears. It seems they havent actually "lost" the flag, as much as they just didnt actually apply for it!  Thanks Andrew;

MALLORCA TODAY - Pollensa loses blue flags
The four beaches in Pollensa - Tamarells in the port, Molins and Barques in Cala San Vicente and the Formentor beach - have all lost their blue flag ratings this year on account of the town hall having decided not to apply for them, the consequence of problems that arose with the contracts for beach management last year.

After all is said and done, a lot more will be said than done!

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andrew711

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2012, 13:16:02 PM »
Yes, wanted to spare themselves the potential embarrassment of actually not obtaining the blue flags, so it was a pre-emptive move. But still highlights the problems with getting the beach contracts sorted out. The town hall can't blame the last admin if this doesn't proceed smoothly this year, and it doesn't appear to be.

But. Does it really matter? The blue flag? Do people pay much attention to this?

Belladonna

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2012, 14:46:05 PM »
Looks good on the beaches map though!  I think it should be mandatory that all public beaches apply for it actually, in order to make sure they keep to a certain health, safety and hygiene standard. Or is there something in place for that already?
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Tia

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2012, 17:20:10 PM »
I believe there is a European directive  ::) which covers basic levels of cleanliness and safety Belladonna  :).
Don't worry........Be happy !!!!

Belladonna

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2012, 14:40:42 PM »
Andrew's take on the Blue Flag.  Maybe a little controversial on your last sentence though!  ;)

Lowering The Blue Flag: Pollensa's beaches
Pollensa town hall has decided to spare its own blushes and to not apply for blue flags for its beaches this year. The reason for this decision is that the fiasco regarding its contracts (one contract in fact) for beach management last year meant that compliance with certain criteria was not as it should have been. The chances are that the flags, one of the four at any rate, that of Puerto Pollensa's main beach, would have been withdrawn. It was better, therefore, to make a pre-emptive strike and simply not apply.

The fact that Pollensa will not have blue flags following the next round of awards is going to be styled as town hall incompetence and as a major blow to the town's tourism. There is some justification for the incompetence charge, as Lord alone knows why Pollensa seems unique in being incapable of getting its beach management act sorted out. But incompetence or not, there is no reason at all to believe that the flags not flying will have any impact whatsoever on the town's tourism. And the reason for this is that there is precious little evidence as to the role blue flags play in influencing tourist decision-making.

The blue flag concept dates back to the mid-1980s. Originally a French idea, it spawned European Commission interest and support. An organisation, now called the Foundation for Environmental Education, was formed to oversee the programme, one that has since gone global.

The original French initiative had to do with water quality and sewage treatment. Thirty or so years ago, it was an important move. But things are very different nowadays. Regardless of blue flags, local authorities are far more in tune with the notion of environmental protection and cleanliness as they are with service provision, but the award of the blue flag has assumed a status by which it is believed that it is conspicuous by its absence from a beach. Believed to be, but is it really?

An informative study published a few years ago in the "Journal of Sustainable Tourism" discovered that labelling, such as the blue flag, only marginally influenced tourists' decisions. Indeed, tourists overwhelmingly didn't really understand what this labelling meant, and in the case of the blue flag it is understandable if today's tourist isn't entirely clear.

What started out as a necessary system to improve water quality has grown like topsy. The document which explains the criteria stretches to 34 pages and these criteria have long ceased to apply merely to sewage treatment. They cover everything from supply of drinking water, to wheelchair access, to personnel who prevent possible "conflicts" breaking out on beaches.

This is all good stuff you would think, but the blue-flag system has been consumed by its own self-importance and its consistent expansion to include aspects of beach existence that were never originally contemplated. Like other systems of quality, e.g. ISO standards, it has stopped being a means to an end (clean water and clean beaches) and become an end to a means. The process of compliance is more important than the end result, and it is a process that demands resources, time and money.

It is the fact that Pollensa knows that it would fall down on this process because of the contracts imbroglio which has led it to not apply this year. The town hall will cop some flak as a result, but I might be inclined, were I the town's mayor, to tell them to stick their blue flags. He wouldn't of course, because, as with any other town with beach resorts, he knows that he and his administration are expected to go through hoops on an annual basis that are now a bureaucratic, tyrannical imposition, non-compliance with which amounts to being named and shamed as not being blue-flagged.

An assumption that will be made, and this is why the blue-flag system is falling into potential disrepute, is that waters off Pollensa's beaches are somehow unsafe. But this is not why the town hall is not applying. It's not the water (the original motivation behind the blue flag) but the beaches themselves, or rather whether they had the right shower facilities or not. In fact, whether one of the four beaches did or not. But the assumption may well be made, as most people would believe that the original notion is still all that counts.

The good news, though, is that this assumption will be made by only a few. And this is because of the marginal influence that systems such as the blue flag have. Pollensa is not about to be affected negatively by not flying the flag, and were the town hall to in future thumb its nose at the whole blue-flag system, I, for one, would applaud it.


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Bonyslad

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2012, 10:47:41 AM »
Must agree with Andrew's sentiments here.

 When I was a nipper we never worried about this elf and safety nonsense . Me Mam used to send me down the beach to collect shells , unexploded ones !!!!


 BL  ;D ;D
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Eleanor

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2012, 13:14:41 PM »
I do agree that it is better to have the blue flag then not to have it! Times are hard and whilst I'm sure there would be very few people who wouldn't base their holiday on whether a place has a blue flag or not it just seems a careless attitude not to do the necessary to secure it.
It is just one more thing on the list and it is a positive thing too. To me it just seems that those that be have a somewhat arogant attitude. It is not good either to be seen to have had the flag and then not to have it as people do form their own conclusions whether correct or not.

It just seems to me that it is one more thing - along with no beach beds - etc etc that realy give the feel that those that be just don't care. Perhaps I am wrong but it is just a 'feeling'.  :(
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girlie in the corner

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2012, 08:26:27 AM »
Blue flags, sunbeds, beach brollies, showers etc etc.  Don't agree.  Sorry  :o  Why is that once a beach has them, everyone then gets in their cars and searches out the deserted coves and empty beaches.  (aka The Beach, Leonardo di Caprio).

Eleanor

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #9 on: April 27, 2012, 09:46:57 AM »
Lol Girlie!  ;D  You have a good point here!  ;D
Eleanor


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Belladonna

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2012, 14:42:18 PM »
In the Daily Bulletin today.

The Port of Pollensa Residents Association will once again be managing the cleaning and hire of equipment on the local beaches this summer.
tHE AWARD OF THE BEACH MANAGEMENT contract to the Neighbourhood Association in the port of Pollensa comes one yuear after the drama of the association losing last summers bid to an outside contender.
It was the first occasion on which the association had not been managing the beach in the Port, but this year members face the additional challenge of cleaning and hiring out sunbeds and sun shades at Cala Sant Vicenc as well as on the beach in the Port of Pollensa.
The neighbourhood Association will be using the beach equipment which it has hirwed out in the past. In addition, members have come to an agreement with the licensee at CV whereby his sunbeds and sunshades can be utilised instead of the association having to purchase and bring in its own. The agreemement has meant that beach services will be up and running more quickly to meet the requirememnts of tourists arriving in steady droves in Pollensa.

Las year when the association lost the bid to challenger, there was a delay in getting the sunbeds and sunshades out onto the beach because of haranguing in the aftermath of the award of contract.  The Neighbourhood Association had challenged the decision of the Council and the resulting dispute merely served to put the provision of beach services on hold, creating a poo9r image of serices to tourism.
Also this week, the local authorities will firm up a contract with the lifeguards and apparently not before time. Reports are that complaints have been pouring in over the past few weeks from hoteliers and bathers about the lack of beach equipment and of safety personnel in the Port.

Unquote.

This week, I have seen the beds being piled up on the beach oppsite the Hotel Pollentia, and also the poles for the umbrellas are up past The Capri.

Now we just need the weather to settle in to all sunshine, and we are well and truely ready for summer!   Meanwhile, I am typing this at the airport coming back to winter!!   :-[
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Belladonna

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2012, 08:48:33 AM »

We dont get a blue flag, but what flat would you put up instead?

Quote;

This year no blue flag waving on the beaches of Pollença. The government team decided not to process the application for renewal of the blue flags and the Foundation for Environmental Education (FEE), which recognizes internationally the quality of beaches, it has not been granted.

But in Cala Molins beach in the coastal village of Cala San Vincente, and have found a substitute. Instead, they have placed a Spanish flag, I guess to emphasize that we are not in Iceland. Pollença's opposition has asked the team to recover the previous government. The Spanish flag placing has become fashionable, was first and now are Real Molins Creek. What will be next?

(MAGDALENA SERRA. INCA@DIARIODEMALLORCA.ES)
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Bonyslad

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2013, 14:50:13 PM »
See in the Blue Flags awards that Playa Formentor, Playa Tamarells , Cala Barques and Cala Mollins have blue flags this year. Not sure what exactly happened last year but looks ok this year .

 On a similar vein mate was telling me that Saint Elms Beach has been closed for the last two days after being inundated with jelly fish. Down there yesterday and they were scooping em up with a tractor.

 Hear that Cala Ratjada has now been similarly stricken.

Problem of over fishing ( tuna in particular ) . If you remove a section of the food chain something has to give.

 Let's hope the wind direction doesn't change and inflict us next !

BL >:( :)
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Belladonna

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2013, 21:16:55 PM »
Very informative BL. So good you posted twice! Always a concern when you see problems with nature though. Although if mozzies suddenly disappeared I wouldnt cry too much!
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Belladonna

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Re: Not so good news
« Reply #14 on: May 26, 2013, 19:45:20 PM »
Andrew's blog;


Waving The Flag (Or Not)

The Balearics have this year lost more blue flags than any other region of Spain. This loss has not been on account of poor water quality but because beaches do not have sufficient numbers of lifeguards. Where the Blue Flag programme demands two lifeguards, some beaches in Mallorca only have one, the reason being because, under Balearics regulations, only one is necessary.

On the face of it, this sounds like very poor PR for Mallorca. You can imagine the headlines - "Holidaymakers' lives put at risk by absent lifeguards in Mallorca". Or something along these lines. It would sound bad, but who's making it sound bad? It is the people behind the Blue Flag programme, the Foundation for Environmental Education that sits in Copenhagen, passing judgement on beaches here, there and everywhere, and which acts like a virtual governmental body in issuing its decrees and awards.

I have spoken before about the Blue Flag programme and its organisers. I have no beef with the original motives behind the programme - ensuring the quality of sea water - but I do have a serious beef with the way in which the tentacles of the programme have, like an octopus extending its many arms and wrapping them around whatever happens to float past it, performed their own constrictive, bureaucratic, self-determined grabs of ever more elements of beach life to justify the programme's existence. It is a programme, a concept - that of the blue flag - that has acquired its own self-fulfilling existence. It has, I'm sorry to have to say, become imperialist in its hunger for influence and importance.

The Blue Flag programme is a classic example of a concept that started out with the very best intentions but which has been consumed by its own power - or its belief in its own power. The argument will be made that holidaymakers pay great attention to its awards and its withdrawals - an argument the organisation will make and that others will nod in agreement with. But do holidaymakers pay such attention? Once upon a time, they might have done, back in the days when the recycling of last night's dinner could be seen floating off a beach. Those days have largely gone, though. Local authorities, such as those in Mallorca, are fully aware of their duties of care to health and to the environment. And were they not, then their failings would be swiftly and abruptly made public. All over the internet, as an example.

Negative news about blue flags in Mallorca, or indeed positive news relating to them, is meat and drink for the local Mallorcan media, which takes reports of withdrawal of flags and elevates them to states of virtual scandal, when they are nothing of the sort. Yes, do let's have as many lifeguards as possible on Mallorca's beaches, but who really, among the holidaymaking public, pays any great attenton to what the Blue Flag programme has to say?

Take Puerto Pollensa. It doesn't have a flag at present. And? Has this been a reason for tourists refusing to come to the resort? I would suggest that it hasn't been. Indeed, I would be hugely surprised had they. The Blue Flag programme is not irrelevant - it most certainly has been relevant in promoting water safety - but its remit has gone way too far, and it has been a remit that it has determined for itself in advancing its own justification for existence and, as with any aspiring-to-near-governmental-status body, it milks its awards and withdrawals for all they are worth, ensuring that a media, inclined to only believe and promote the negative, laps up. As it does locally.

But this is the nub of the matter. Local. The absence of a lifeguard or two and the Blue Flag's promotion of the fact is used as evidence against irresponsible local authorities. The media heartily endorses this, but it doesn't stop to enquire about the messenger, the Blue Flag organisation, and about its grab of influence and power. Away from the local arena, though, no one really gives a damn. If they did, then Puerto Pollensa would be empty this summer as would be other coastal areas without the flag.

The fact is that the Blue Flag is a somewhat shallow trophy. Shallow, because it doesn't mean a great deal to everyday holidaymakers. There are some to whom it does, and they are those who still labour under the misapprehension that the Blue Flag programme is primarily or exclusively to do with its original purpose. But there are others for whom the programme has been an exercise in nothing more than an expansionist tendency.


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