Author Topic: A nice little 'Green' touch  (Read 833 times)

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Mary Lorenzo

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A nice little 'Green' touch
« on: July 10, 2014, 09:36:43 AM »
I know I am running the risk of being accused of possibly having a 'slow' day yesterday but  I made a nice little discovery about recycling which I feel compelled to share on the forum!

I am sure that some members will say, yeah  ::) we already knew that....but for those that don't........(very faint drum roll!  ::) ), I discovered that you can place empty Tetra Paks in the yellow recycling bins here.  ;D  So empty juice cartons, empty UHT milk cartons can all go in with the plastic bottles and cans!

The recycling of empty Tetra paks has always been quite a tricky job and not so many places in the UK actually have suitable processing places for them.

(and please don't anyone say "and now they'll all end up in a landfill somewhere"  :'( )

« Last Edit: July 10, 2014, 09:47:19 AM by Mary Lorenzo »

Mary Lorenzo

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Re: A nice little 'Green' touch
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2014, 09:46:17 AM »
And here courtesy of Wikipedia is a little bit about the recycling of Tetra Paks.....

Quote
Recycling

Since the aseptic packages contain different layers of plastic and aluminium in addition to raw paper, they cannot be recycled as "normal" paper waste, but need to go to special recycling units for separation of the different materials. Tetra Pak has operated limited recycling since the mid-1980s, introducing a recycling program for its cartons in Canada as early as 1990.[10][34] In 2000, Tetra Pak invested Bt20m (€500,000) in Southeast Asia's first recycling plant for aseptic packages, in Thailand.[52] Recycling of the aseptic packages has indeed been one of Tetra Pak's big challenges.[53] Once separated, the aseptic carton results in aluminium and pure paraffin which can be used in industry.[54] Even without separating the carton materials, however, the aseptic carton can be reused, a Tetra Pak spokesman said, for example in engineering equipment.[54] In 2010 30 billion used Tetra Pak carton packages were recycled, a doubling since 2002.[55] The company stated that it aims to help double the rate of recycling in the next ten years, something that will require an engagement within the whole recycling chain.[48] As per 2011, 20% of Tetra Pak cartons are recycled globally, with countries like Belgium, Germany, Spain and Norway showing local recycling rates of over 50%.[56] To increase the level of recycling and meet the targets, Tetra Pak has engaged in driving recycling activities such as facilitating the development of collection schemes, launch new recycling technologies and raise the awareness about recycling and sustainability.[56] Used Tetra Pak packages have been used as construction material in different design projects, with varying results.[5][5

Bonyslad

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Re: A nice little 'Green' touch
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2014, 10:37:24 AM »
Am surprised there is no recycling of tin here , Mary or am I missing something . What do you do wiv yer empty tonic cans !!!!!

Sight to behold your bottle recycling box on your terrace !!!!

BL  ;D ;D
BonysLad

HEY. YOU. Get off of my cloud ( of wonderful ) !!

Mary Lorenzo

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Re: A nice little 'Green' touch
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2014, 11:09:05 AM »
Yep, do not worry BL, you should put all - and I mean all of your cans-  in the yellow bins too!  They take all plastic containers and all metal containers and also all Tetra paks as mentioned above......it's then all hand sorted from what I understand.

All empty bottles are removed from my household under cover of darkness so as not be be branded an 'alky' by any neighbours  ;D