Author Topic: A different type of tourism  (Read 2060 times)

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Belladonna

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A different type of tourism
« on: October 27, 2011, 09:41:59 AM »
(Taken from Andrew's blog)


Industrial tourism is growing. There is a European congress devoted to it; the fourth gathering will be in Portugal next year. The European Tourism Day, celebrated at the end of September, concentrated on the promotion of industrial heritage and on how it can contribute to the diversification of tourism in general.

The growth in interest is to be welcomed. But unfortunately, much which goes under the term industrial tourism simply gets shunted into a museum. Sometimes workings are preserved or simulated, but for me the far greater interest lies in the industrial sites themselves, whether they be in ruin or maintained.

Spain does quite well when it comes to industrial tourism; Toledo, for example, is a major centre. The French do it rather better than the Spanish, and not just in a town's local "zone industrielle". Every year some 20 million people visit 1400 sites and museums of different sorts. Sadly, Mallorca doesn't have much to offer. Or rather, it has quite a bit, just that no one much knows about it and next to nothing is done to let them know about it.

Mallorca's forgotten industrial past sounds like a contradiction. The island's industry, pre-tourism, was predominantly agricultural, but by no means exclusively. There is a charity, the Foundation for the Recuperation and Study of Balearics Rail and Industrial Heritage, that attempts to promote the island's forgotten industry, which, at the start of the 1950s, involved some 35% of the population working in factories producing the likes of chemicals.

Most towns have evidence of old industry, if you look hard enough. Some of it has fallen into a poor state, such as the carpet factory in Pollensa. Closed in 1960 and posing a danger as it might collapse at any time, the town hall wants it declassified as an "asset of cultural interest", so that it can be demolished and then rebuilt. This would be a shame. Far better would be to perform restoration work and then promote it as a site of tourism interest. But of course no one's got any money to do anything with it.

Elsewhere on the island there are disused mineworks - in Alaró and Felanitx. Though mining dates back to the start of the nineteenth century, it was stopped until the Franco years, and the mineworks are evidence of the economic strategy of self-sufficiency (autarky) that for many years Franco sought for Spain.

But you don't necessarily have to go hunting for such sites. In Lloseta, for example, you can hardly miss the giant cement works. Not that this is disused. It benefits from using coal ash from the Es Murterar power station by the Albufera nature park, the power station that took over from the old one in Puerto Alcúdia and which has been all but abandoned for years.

The old power station, though, is arguably Mallorca's foremost industrial site. It has been named among the one hundred most important industrial heritage sites in Spain; it was symbolic of Mallorca's more recent industrial development in the 1950s, which is when it was constructed.

Plans to convert the power station into a museum have fallen foul of economic crisis. These plans, if they are ever indeed realised, are sympathetic to the architecture. The chimneys, for example, would be preserved. Though it can be argued that the power station forms something of a blot on the landscape on the sweep of Alcúdia Bay, its main structures should stay. Indeed, it should all stay.

If finance is going to be such an issue for its re-development, and it is going to be, then consideration might be given to a less ambitious scheme; one by which the site is made into one of tourism interest and is open to visitors. It could also include a museum, but on a smaller scale, one devoted to the history of the power station and to all the forgotten industrial heritage of Mallorca.

Industrial tourism is growing, Mallorca has little of it, so why not create some.


After all is said and done, a lot more will be said than done!

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Belladonna

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2011, 09:45:27 AM »
Personally I think this is a great idea! I have a  hubby who is almost a building history geek, and loves finding old building,, factories etc. and discussing with me what they were etc etc. "Discussing" being a bit of a misnomer though, I contribute with the occassional lifted eyebrows, coupled with the "really?" word, delivered with what I hope is the expected enthusiasm!  ;)
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ClareABell

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2011, 12:44:23 PM »
I thought it was just me!
I am obsessed with old, abandoned, disused buildings. I love taking photos of them, and walking around them imagining them when they were operational. There are actually photography books dedicated to this.
It would be wonderful to see some of these places brought back to life. I hate things being demolished.

Eleanor

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2011, 13:12:24 PM »
Personally I think this is a great idea! I have a  hubby who is almost a building history geek, and loves finding old building,, factories etc. and discussing with me what they were etc etc. "Discussing" being a bit of a misnomer though, I contribute with the occassional lifted eyebrows, coupled with the "really?" word, delivered with what I hope is the expected enthusiasm!  ;)

Glad I'm not alone here as my husband is just the same but also being an architect he goes to the extreme too from very old structures to newish i.e. gherkin! I'm afraid I have lectures on the subject but unlike you Bella have got to the stage  of not showing any enthusiasm at all and just the odd 'right'!
His problem is that when he finds a  building - of any age - which he dislikes he then spends hours 'discussing' how he would re-design which often includes pull the flipping thing down and build his new building!  ::) ::)

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Belladonna

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2011, 10:24:05 AM »
Cruise Tourism - Myth or Magic?

Andrew's view;

By way of a coincidence, a couple of mentions of cruise tourism over the past few days had worked themselves into my consciousness. I referred to one of them yesterday; the other had simply lodged in my memory banks.

The reference I made was to Leo Hickman who has lumped cruise ships in with all-inclusive hotels in branding them one of the worst forms of tourism in that they generate little by way of benefit to local economies. The one I hadn't referred to, but now do, was to Puerto Alcúdia and a question asked by the restaurant association as to why its new commercial port was not receiving cruise ships.

In Alcúdia there was talk of it becoming a port of call. It was one reason why so much was invested in developing the new terminal and in deepening the waters. To date, it has not become a port of call and it may never become so. The restaurant association would wish otherwise, as it would hope to reap the benefits from stopover passengers.

The benefits. Ah yes, the benefits of cruise tourism to local economies. These are the benefits that Palma (though not exclusively Palma) derives from cruise tourism and which the city anticipates more of as the volume of cruise traffic increases.

But, as we are reminded not infrequently, passengers disembark, wallets bulging, ready to spend wildly, only to find shops closed. At least, this is one of the sticks which are used to beat Palma shopowners into opening submission and which is used to criticise an inert local tourism-related industry that spurns the opportunities from cruise tourists.

Alcúdia's restaurants presumably believe that they, along with other local businesses, would enjoy untold riches from passengers taking a bit of shore leave. Would they, though?

One of the most important pieces of research into the economic impact of cruise tourism was undertaken by the Policy Research Corporation on behalf of the European Commission. Based on data from October 2008 to September 2009, it looked at, among other things, expenditure by passengers. Of the top 15 ports in Europe, Palma was ranked sixth with around 53 million euros, a figure that rose to 70 million when crew and ship expenditures were added.

The report calculated specific expenditures dependent upon whether passengers disembarked during a stopover (and not all do) and whether they were joining or leaving the ship. The average spend was, respectively, 60 and 95 euros per passenger (the figure being the same whether joining or leaving).

In themselves, the figures seem healthy enough, but you need to dig down into them to understand what they represent. Mostly all the spend by a passenger joining or leaving a ship is on hotel accommodation; the spend of the passenger who disembarks for the day goes primarily towards an excursion of some sort.

The cruise ship functions in its own way. Because stopovers are short, it organises well in advance, as in booking excursions with a select few attractions/activities for which the cruise ship typically extracts a significant commission; and it is said that this can be as high as 50%, which immediately slashes that expenditure which gets into the local economy.

The ship has its arrangements with hotels, with a handful of chosen excursions and perhaps with certain shops or others, and a commission will operate in almost every instance. The benefit, in other words, tends to be spread very thinly. And where the passenger has some "free" time, what can he actually contribute over and above what has pretty much been pre-determined? P&O, for example, lists Pollensa and Formentor as one of its nine shore excursions. In Pollensa there are 30 minutes "to do as you choose ... it is the perfect place to have a morning coffee".

And so that's about it. A coffee. Very little, and the restaurants of Alcúdia might bear this in mind, is actually spent on food. It's the same issue as with all-inclusives, as the passenger has generally already paid for his food on the ship. At most he might buy a small snack and the odd drink while on shore, and that's it.

There is plenty more that could be said about cruise ships and cruise tourism; about the environmental damage caused by ships, and which is greatly understated, or about the fact that little or no direct employment is generated. A benefit does come from cruises, but it is not as great as might be thought, a point made by Professor Paul Wilkinson of Canada's York University, and a leading researcher into cruise tourism, who has said that "cruise visitors have little potential economic impact".


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Belladonna

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2011, 10:30:24 AM »
Spot on Andrew. We have been lucky enough over the years to go on two or three cruises. Every shore excursion to cities and towns was the same; bundled into a coach to get there if it was far away, hence no time to do anything except find a loo, glance at souvenirs and grab a drink if you were lucky. If it was a port excursion you invariable thought you were going to get ripped off so never  bought anything anyway!
It doesn't work. If there is a next time, I will be spending the time on board having a beauty treatment in the relative peace and quiet!  ;)
The only way it ever works is a night stop over to give people time to plan and travel a bit if they wish. But not everyone wants to stay in the same place when on a cruise. And have you SEEN the Easyjet stop over cruise programme on TV??!!  :o
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Belladonna

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2011, 09:07:43 AM »
The tourism debate continues, with Andrew's play writing skills coming to the fore!

Who Wants To Be A Nine Times Millionaire?
Nine million is a fair amount of wonga. You can do all sorts of things with nine million, like paying the Duke of Palma’s institute four times over - allegedly. Or it could pay the mortgage for ten apartments of the sort that President Bauzá has in what is described as one of the the most expensive parts of Spain - Sa Calatrava in Palma - and not allegedly, but fact.

So yes, nine million goes a fair old way. But it still does depend upon how you might intend blowing it all. That’s why I’m giving you a little game and then test. It’s best if two of you play; something for one of those boring winter afternoons in Mallorca when there’s nothing open and the skies are ominously silent and without any sign of aircraft. One of you has to imagine that he or she is the tourism minister (to get into the right mood, think being a bit of a shorthouse, if you aren’t already one, and being generally disliked especially by members of your own party). The other has to pretend to be in charge of the tourism promotion pot at the Balearics Tourism Agency. Ok, ready?

Tourism minister: “Right now, Juan (feel free to substitute a different name, if you wish), the president, myself and the finance chappy have been putting our heads together and we’ve come up with your budget for next year. Hold your hands out.”

Juan: “Nine million! What do you expect me to do with nine million? Have you any idea how many countries we’re supposed to be promoting to?”

Tourism minister: “Look, it doesn’t matter. The Brits’ll be flocking in next year anyway. And the Krauts. The Ruskies, too. Up 80% more already this year. Think of all that bling jangling as it reaches for the folding notes. It’ll do wonders for the tourism spend statistics. Great PR for when they’re all rioting in the streets next summer when Rajoy pulls the plug on pensions.”

Juan: “But nine million. That’s barely enough to pay for Nadal’s arm let alone Nadal. Then there’s the boat. And the prime time. The prime time, minister, in God knows how many countries. Nine million. That’s the approximate equivalent of only one euro for every tourist who comes to Mallorca.”

Tourism minister: “Yea, but we’re not using Nadal, unless he does it for nothing. And what’s this one euro for every tourist business got to do with anything?”

Juan: “Well, nothing really. I just thought it sounded good. You know, like in a political way.”

Tourism minister: “Brilliant. You’re on to something. I’ll use it for my next speech. The government will be spending one euro on every tourist coming to Mallorca. It’s so ambiguous it’s genius. Is it austere or is it generous?”

Now, having undertaken your role play, you have to, using your skill and judgement, come up with how you would spend just nine million euros for a whole year to promote not just Mallorca, but also Menorca, Ibiza and Formentera, not just to the UK, but also to Germany, Scandinavia, France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Ireland, Poland, Russia, Ukraine, China … .

Ah, you see, it’s not so easy, is it? Put you on the spot a bit. It’s no use saying they should splash out on some grand TV ad campaign, because they’re not going to. Not on nine million they’re not.

While one of you figures out how best to spend the meagre nine million, the tourism ministers among you need to think strategy. That’s a tough one, as there haven’t been many tourism ministers who have ever done that. But it’s important. Really important. You might be able to get away with spending hardly anything next year, but nothing lasts for ever, as Mallorca well knows having slid from its one-time position of invincibility. But this is Mallorca’s big chance, perhaps its last chance.

Events have conspired to create a record summer for tourism in 2011 and will do so again in 2012. But after next year? It’s going to take some money, and rather more than nine million annually.

By the way, those of you who come up with the most creative ways of spending the nine million will be entered into a prize draw. First prize is two weeks in a Mallorcan-owned all-inclusive hotel. In winter. In the Dominican Republic.

(And by way of clarification, the budget for tourism promotion last year was 27 million, which should in fact have been 44 million.)


After all is said and done, a lot more will be said than done!

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Belladonna

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2011, 08:39:24 AM »
In the DB today, looks like cruising is still growing!

Balearics is cruising
Palma.—The Balearics has this year handled the second highest number of cruise passengers in Spain.
Only Cataluña, with the port of Barcelona, has handled more between January and September.
Cataluña has been visited by just over two million cruise passengers while 1'273'098 have put into the Balearics’ ports.
In fact, the two regions have, to date, accounted for a 58 percent share of the national cruise market of 5.8 million passengers.

Record
During the first nine months of this year, the total number of cruise passengers coming to Spain was 12.7 percent up on last year and sources said yesterday that, come the end of the year, that figure may well have risen to a record eight million.

Barcelona is now the busiest cruise port in Europe and the fifth busiest in the world and, along with Palma, is braced for a significant increase in cruise ships and passengers again next year with the large North American and Scandinavian cruise liners going to have a big presence in the Western Mediterranean.


Bigger and better
The Port Authority has been continually expanding and improving facilities in the Port of Palma this year in order to cater for the liners which are being built bigger and better than before.

After all is said and done, a lot more will be said than done!

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Bonyslad

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2011, 22:21:58 PM »
Cracked it !!
 
Just reading the economics behind the McPanda's . This could be the answer to winter tourism . Get the Mallorca tourist board negotiating with the Chinese immediately for a five year loan of these magnificent beasts and watch those winter flights come roaring back.

Be particularly attractive if they get frisky ( alas only happens two to three days per year ) outside of the summer season.

You know it makes sense, Rodney !!

 BL  ;D ;D
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Belladonna

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2012, 08:58:54 AM »






 
 
In Ultima Hora today - well at least someone is trying to get it going!!



Calvia

Walking and cycling to promote winter tourism







The Calvia Town Hall yesterday presented its new plan to combat seasonality in tourism that emphasizes, expanding the offer in terms of walking and cycling, to be promoted to the source markets, with sports facilities with which the municipality.

Both the authorities and municipal technicians both highlighted these two activities as the main products that motivate tourists visit in winter Calvia, so explained that a total of eleven promoted hiking and cycling five through editing over 80,000 brochures will be distributed at trade shows and events to promote tourism. As indicated by the product will be presented before the markets mainly Austrian, German, British and Scandinavian and also offers information on tourist offices of the municipality and through www.visitcalvia.com page.

During the presentation the mayor said Manuel Onieva promoted routes are in perfect condition and marked. Thus, five were marked cycling routes, where the start and end point is located in the municipality, to turn in Calvià "perfect room" for cyclists.

On the trails were published eleven different routes, for which the visitor can take different routes breakfasts that discloses the cultural, ethnological and natural with which the municipality.

Sports

Besides this two ways, which are the two big news promotional campaign 2012-2013, municipal officials have indicated that they will continue insisting on the European tourist market on the benefits arising from the municipality in offseason to practice other sports as rugby, football and athletics.
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Belladonna

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2013, 06:58:55 AM »
Andrew's blog today;

Is Religion Mallorca's Alternative Tourism?
What has happened with the proposal for a Christian theme park (last heard of somewhere near Inca)? It may well have been quietly forgotten, which would be unsurprising as it is/was a bit odd to say the least. This said, the religious element, where tourism is concerned, is not in the least bit odd.

Religious tourism is the oldest form of tourism. It is not, in its original manifestations, what we would call tourism nowadays, but pilgrimages were a type of tourism. They still are, and nowhere in Spain receives more pilgrims than Santiago de Compostela. Pilgrims, though, are only one facet of religious tourism. Indeed, it is not necessary for a tourist to be a pilgrim or in any way religious in order to take part in and to enjoy religious tourism. The very word "religious" may turn many visitors off, but religious tourism embraces several different elements. Spirituality is or can be one, but there are others - history, culture, architecture, music, literature, folklore, ethnology and the weird niche known as "dark" tourism (cemeteries, atrocities and other such stuff).

On 28 March 1515 Teresa of Ávila was born. She became Saint Teresa of Jesus. She is considered an important figure in the history of the Catholic Church and in Spanish history. A national commission may be established in order to draw up events to commemorate the 500th anniversary of her birth in 2015. Meantime, the tourism minister for the region of Castile and León has already announced a tourism "product" related to Saint Teresa and one that will include collaboration with four other regions of Spain.

On 24 November 1713 Miguel Joseph Serra was born in the Mallorcan town of Petra. He became Father Junipero Serra, an important figure in Mallorcan history and in the history of California. 2013 has been Serra's "year". The climax of this year, one guesses, will be on or around the twenty-fourth of next month. One guesses, but what has really been made of the 300th anniversary of the birth of this significant person?

While the Ávila celebration would clearly be much grander in scope and would focus on a very much better known religious figure, a fear might be that a tourism product would be mainly or only religious. Similarly, one fears, it is only the religion and the missionary efforts of Father Junipero that have dominated thinking regarding his anniversary.

Increasingly, I have come to question the notion of niching tourism products which are alternatives to the Mallorcan mainstream of sun and beach. The marketing mantra is that of niching, but a problem with niching is that it establishes a limit in terms of scope and appeal. Some niches do reasonably well by concentrating on a single product. Cycling is a case in point, but far from all cyclists are interested only in cycling. There are examples of businesses in Mallorca which promote essentially niche products, including cycling, but which offer a far wider experience. And they are right to do so.

Religious tourism as a niche is not or should not be solely about religion. If it is, then it comes with an in-built limit. To take Father Junipero, it may come as a shock to some Mallorcans to know how little his name means anything outside Mallorca and California, but had there been a genuine tourism "product" built around his anniversary and to be maintained going forward, then he would be but only part of a vastly bigger product. Mallorca's religious history is far from unimportant but it is a history whose appeal lies with the island's fabulous cathedral, churches, sanctuaries and hermitages. And these fabulous buildings are to be found everywhere, in every town on the island, in every town with a different landscape and a different story to tell, in every town with varying other interests, be they wildlife, gastronomy, wine, agriculture and fiestas and fairs.

The celebration of Saint Teresa would envisage a "route" that stretches as far as Seville. It will be a most interesting route, but it will be a long route and one that may neglect more secular interests. Mallorca as a religious tourism destination has one huge advantage over such a route. It is small, compact. And within this small and compact island there is masses of religion to be seen and enjoyed alongside everything else on the island. It would not be called religious tourism because the term would be a turn-off for too many. It would be The Mallorca Experience, the collective experience of all the different niches and one that is set apart from sun and beach because in winter Mallorca cannot compete on sun and beach.

Niching has its place, of course it does, but perhaps it has dominated thinking too much. It has become marketing religion, but real religion, marketed as a collective Mallorcan whole, could form an answer to prayers to address the drought and famine of winter tourism.
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Bonyslad

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Re: A different type of tourism
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2013, 08:45:12 AM »
Would the martyrdom of the latest Anglican Vicar be included in such a route, Andrew??

From what was written in the DB last week by the Vicar of Palma the Anglicans might have shot themselves in the foot in which case another 2,000 Hail Marys for yours truly for blaming the Catholics.

Hey, ho bring on the Jesus sandalled brigade

BL  ;) ;)
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